Last Updated: Tuesday, 02 September 2014, 13:52 GMT

Macedonia: Information on whether citizens of Macedonia are free to move from one city or town to another, and whether citizens are required to register with police if they move from one city or town to another

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 December 1995
Citation / Document Symbol MCD22038.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Macedonia: Information on whether citizens of Macedonia are free to move from one city or town to another, and whether citizens are required to register with police if they move from one city or town to another, 1 December 1995, MCD22038.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ad7f8c.html [accessed 2 September 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

In a telephone interview on 14 December 1995, a research analyst who specializes in Macedonia and Albania at Prague's Open Media Research Institute (OMRI), a research enterprise dedicated to the study of the former Soviet Union and east-central and south-eastern Europe, provided the following information. Macedonian citizens are free to move from one city or town to another; there are no restrictions placed upon this freedom of movement. According to page 888 of Country Reports for 1994, which is available at Regional Documentation Centres,

Citizens are permitted free movement within the country as well as the right to leave and return. The Government may restrict these rights for security, public health, and safety reasons but fully respects them in practice (1995).

The research analyst also stated that Macedonian citizens are required to register with police in the cities or towns where they reside; Macedonian citizens who relocate would also have to register with the police in the cities or towns to which they move (14 Dec. 1995).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1994. 1995. United States Department of State. Washington, DC: United States Government Printing Office.

Open Media Research Institute (OMRI), Prague. 14 December 1995. Telephone interview with research analyst.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

Search Refworld