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Resolution 994 (1993) on the Massive and Flagrant Violations of Human Rights in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia

Publisher Council of Europe: Parliamentary Assembly
Publication Date 3 February 1993
Cite as Council of Europe: Parliamentary Assembly, Resolution 994 (1993) on the Massive and Flagrant Violations of Human Rights in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia, 3 February 1993, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6b37418.html [accessed 2 August 2014]
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Resolution 994 (1993)[1] on the Massive and Flagrant Violations of Human Rights in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia

THE PARLIAMENTARY ASSEMBLY OF THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE, AT ITS FORTY-FOURTH ORDINARY SESSION

1.The Assembly declares its profound consternation at the massive and flagrant violations of human rights in the territory of the former Yugoslavia and at the perpetration of crimes against humanity such as the murder of innocent victims, concentration camps, torture, the systematic rape of women belonging to minority groups, and in particular to the Muslim population, as a deliberate means of destroying these minorities, "ethnic cleansing" and the deportation of entire populations.

2.The re-emerging currents of xenophobia and racism and racial and nationalist ideologies in Europe are endangering human rights to a degree not witnessed in western Europe since the second world war; this in turn affects the fundamental values of democracy and the rule of law and may have fateful consequences both inside and outside Europe.

3.The Assembly considers that the Council of Europe's most important and urgent task, in the light of its vocation and experience, is above all to provide legal enforcement mechanisms in the field of human rights, something the Council of Europe, alone among European international organisations, is in a position to do.

4.The Assembly refers to the work of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights and in particular to the reports on the human rights situation in the territory of the former Yugoslavia, drawn up by Mr. Tadeusz Mazowiecki as Special Rapporteur, as well as to the work of the commission of enquiry to establish war crimes in Yugoslavia that has been set up by the United Nations Security Council. It welcomes the decision of its Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights to create an ad hoc subcommittee on the human rights situation in the former Yugoslavia.

5.Accordingly, the Assembly:

i.launches a solemn appeal to all parties involved in the conflict in the territory of the former Yugoslavia to respect the Geneva conventions on humanitarian law;

ii.condemns most strongly the massive and flagrant violations of human rights in the territory of the former Yugoslavia, committed mainly by the Serbian militia in Bosnia-Hersegovina;

iii.strongly supports the efforts of the international agencies working to restore peace in the former Yugoslavia and in particular the International Conference on Peace in Former Yugoslavia;

iv.reaffirms its determination to exclude national delegations of member states or states whose parliaments enjoy special guest status, if these states are shown to break the embargo against Serbia and Montenegro.

 



[1]Assembly debate on 3 February 1993 (26th Sitting) (see Doc. 6743, report of the Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights, Rapporteur: Mrs. Haller).

Text adopted by the Assembly on 3 February 1993 (26th Sitting).

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