Last Updated: Wednesday, 27 August 2014, 14:57 GMT

Saint Lucia: Requirements and procedures to obtain a police report from within St. Lucia as well as from abroad; whether there is a national standard format of the report issued by police stations; if so, the information it contains

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Publication Date 22 February 2012
Citation / Document Symbol LCA103855.E
Related Document Sainte-Lucie : information sur les exigences et la marche à suivre pour obtenir un rapport de police depuis Sainte-Lucie et depuis l'étranger; information indiquant si une forme type de rapport est utilisée dans les postes de police; le cas échéant, information sur les renseignements qu'il contient
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Saint Lucia: Requirements and procedures to obtain a police report from within St. Lucia as well as from abroad; whether there is a national standard format of the report issued by police stations; if so, the information it contains, 22 February 2012, LCA103855.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/50aa30762.html [accessed 27 August 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

1. Procedures to Obtain a Police Report within Saint Lucia

A corporal at the Criminal Records Department of the Royal Saint Lucia Police Force stated, in a telephone interview with the Research Directorate, that an individual can request a copy of a police report by going to the police station where he or she reported the crime and speaking with the officer-in-charge (Saint Lucia 26 Jan. 2012). He explained that the officer-in-charge or the investigating officer will then "extract the information from the crime diary and forward it to the crime management unit to be processed" (ibid.). In contrast, both a sergeant at the Anse La Raye Police Station and a practicing attorney in Castries indicated in separate telephone interviews with the Research Directorate that the individual must request the police report from the Commissioner of Police (Saint Lucia 9 Jan. 2012; Attorney 10 Jan. 2012), who is located in Castries, Saint Lucia (Saint Lucia 9 Jan. 2012; ibid. 26 Jan. 2012).

2. Procedures to Obtain a Police Report from Abroad

The Corporal at the Criminal Records Department said that someone who is abroad can request a police report by writing to the Commissioner of Police at the police headquarters in Castries (Saint Lucia 26 Jan. 2012). He noted that the person can either write to the Commissioner directly or make the request through a lawyer (ibid.). He explained that, in the letter, the person needs to include the name of the station where the crime was originally reported, the date of the incident, and information about the incident (ibid.).

All three sources agreed that an individual who is abroad could have someone in Saint Lucia request the police report on his or her behalf (ibid.; ibid. 9 Jan. 2012; Attorney 10 Jan. 2012). Both the attorney and the Corporal explained that the individual would need to provide the person in Saint Lucia with a letter of authorization signed by a notary public (ibid.; Saint Lucia 26 Jan. 2012). The attorney noted that the authorized person could be a relative, friend or lawyer (Attorney 10 Jan. 2012).

The Corporal said that the authorized person in Saint Lucia should request the police report at the local police station where the crime was reported (Saint Lucia 26 Jan. 2012), while the Sergeant and the attorney indicated that the authorized person should request the report from the Commissioner of Police (ibid. 9 Jan. 2012; Attorney 10 Jan. 2012).

3. Likelihood of Obtaining a Police Report

The attorney explained that Saint Lucia does not have access to information laws and that someone who requests a police report from the Commissioner of Police "will not necessarily get the information" (10 Jan. 2012). According to the attorney, information about cases involving misdemeanours or closed cases is more likely to be released than information about cases in which felonies are involved or in which there is an indictment (10 Jan. 2012). This information could not be corroborated by the sources consulted by the Research Directorate within the time constraints of this Response.

4. Processing Time and Fees

The Corporal stated that the allotted time to complete a police report is 5 working days for cases of "lost property" and 21 days for all other cases, although he noted that in some cases it takes longer than 21 days (Saint Lucia 26 Jan. 2012). The attorney indicated that, in her experience, police reports usually take one to two months to complete (10 Jan. 2012). Both the attorney and the Corporal said that the fee for the police report is 50 Eastern Caribbean dollars [C$18 (XE 7 Feb. 2012)] (Attorney 10 Jan. 2012; Saint Lucia 26 Jan. 2012). According to the Corporal, if applicants require the police report to be mailed abroad, they must pay additional shipping costs (ibid.).

5. Format of Police Reports

Police reports in Saint Lucia reportedly adhere to a standard format (Saint Lucia 26 Jan. 2012; ibid. 9 Jan. 2012; Attorney 10 Jan. 2012). The Corporal said that the date, place and details of the crime are standard in all reports (Saint Lucia 26 Jan. 2012).The Corporal and the attorney explained that the reports are on police letterhead, contain information that was asked for in the request, and are signed by a police official (ibid.; Attorney 10 Jan. 2012). The attorney believed that the reports are signed by either the investigating officer or the officer-in-charge (ibid.), while the Corporal maintained that the reports are signed by either the Assistant Commissioner of Police (ACP) or the Superintendent in Charge of Crime (Saint Lucia 26 Jan. 2012).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection. Please find below the list of sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Attorney, Castries, Saint Lucia. 10 January 2012. Telephone interview.

Saint Lucia. 26 January 2012. Royal Saint Lucia Police Force (RSLPF), Criminal Records Department. Telephone interview with a corporal.

_____. 9 January 2012. Royal Saint Lucia Police Force (RSLPF), Anse La Raye Police Station. Telephone interview with a sergaent.

XE. 7 February 2012. "Currency Converter Widget." [Accessed 7 Feb. 2012]

Additional Sources Consulted

Oral sources: A Saint Lucia lawyer and the Consulate General of Saint Lucia in Toronto were unable to provide information for this Response. Officials of the Office of the Commissioner of Police and the Criminal Investigations Department of the Ministry of Legal Affairs, Home Affairs and National Security were unable to provide information within the time constraints of this Response. Attempts to contact the Saint Lucia Embassy in Ottawa were unsuccessful.

Internet sites, including: Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants; Info Cubic; Saint Lucia — Government Information Service, Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Legal Affairs, Home Affairs and National Security.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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