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Somalia: Information on the Lelkase/Leelkase subclan of the Darod and internal flight alternatives and its relations to the Majerteen in Bari and Nugal the Marehan in Gedo and the Ogaden in Lower Juba

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 June 1994
Citation / Document Symbol SOM17572.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Somalia: Information on the Lelkase/Leelkase subclan of the Darod and internal flight alternatives and its relations to the Majerteen in Bari and Nugal the Marehan in Gedo and the Ogaden in Lower Juba, 1 June 1994, SOM17572.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ab552c.html [accessed 26 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

A professor in the Department of African Studies at the University of Florida in Gainsville who is familiar with the present situation in Somalia provided the following information (6 June 1994). The Leelkase are mostly found in the Mudugh region in south-central Somalia. Although the Leelkase and the Majerteen are both from the Darod clan, "relations between them have not been great for a long time and they have fought each other a couple of times." Warm relations have been rare between the two groups. There are few Leelkase in the Bari and Nugal regions. Relations between the two groups in that region may not be cordial.

According to the same source, the Leelkase have been "fighting constantly with the Marehan" in Gedo region. With regard to Leelkase relations with the Ogadeni, there have been Leelkase "elements" in the Ogaden since the outbreak of the conflicts in Mogadishu. Having previously been in alliances against the Ogadeni, the Leelkase relationship with the Ogadeni can be described as "tenuous at best." The Ogadeni in Lower Juba have always perceived the Leelkase and other non-Ogadeni as foreigners, and have treated them as such. Depending on the political circumstances, the Leelkase have made alliances for "survival purposes," but these alliances have not been long lasting. The Leelkase may therefore be "reasonably safe" only in their own area in the Mudugh region.

A representative of Somali Immigrant Aid, a community-based organization in Toronto corroborated the above information (6 June 1994). He added that the Leelkase will be treated like a minority by the Majerteen, Ogadeni and the Marehan (ibid.).

A community liaison officer with the Somali-Canadian Association of Etobicoke stated that although there have been conflicts between the Leelkase and the Majerteen, currently the two are not in conflict (6 June 1994). Nonetheless, some animosity may exist between them (ibid.).

With regard to the Marehan in the Gedo region, the source stated that the two groups have never fought each other and likely were not in conflict (ibid.). The source corroborated the information on the Leelkase and the Ogadeni provided by the professor and the representative of Somali Immigrant Aid. He added that for a Leelkase, the Lower Juba will not be a hospitable place to settle. Also, a Leelkase may be able to settle among Marjeteen in Bari and Nugal, and the Marehan in Gedo without difficulty.

According to an official with the Southern Somali Community Organization of Ontario in North York, the Leelkase are a small group of the Darod clan primarily found in the Mudugh region (6 June 1994). The source noted that "relations with the Majerteen have not been good." Because Bari and Nugal are regions away from Mudugh, few Leelkase may be inhabiting those regions. According to the source, there were attacks by Majerteen on Leelkase between 1964 and 1970, and these have had an impact on relations between the two Darod groups. With regard to the Marehan in Gedo region, the source stated that there is very little interaction between the two as the Leelkase are a small Darod subclan. The source noted that very few Leelkase are found in the region of Lower Juba and that because "the Ogadeni are at war with all the other Darod groups," the Lower Juba may not be a habitable place for Leelkase.

On-line searches by the DIRB have provided information which mentioned the Leelkase in passing. For this general information, please refer to the attachments.

This response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

Professor in the Department of African Studies, University of Florida, Gainville. 6 June 1994. Telephone interview.

Somali-Canadian Association of Etobicoke. 6 June 1994. Telephone interview with community liaison officer.

Somali Immigrant Aid, Toronto. 6 June 1994. Telephone interview with community worker and assistant associate director.

Southern Somali Community Organization of Ontario, North York. 6 June 1994. Telephone interview with representative.

Attachments

The Independent [London]. 5 January 1992. Richard Dowden. "A Dirty Little War." (NEXIS)

Reuters. 18 October 1993. BC Cycle. Aidan Hartley. "Somalia Still Divided Among Clan Militias." (NEXIS)

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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