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Uganda: Information on the 35th Battalion, including its activities, its role in the attack at Namkora, arrests of its members and whether they were released, and on what grounds and conditions they were arrested

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 February 1996
Citation / Document Symbol UGA23073.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Uganda: Information on the 35th Battalion, including its activities, its role in the attack at Namkora, arrests of its members and whether they were released, and on what grounds and conditions they were arrested, 1 February 1996, UGA23073.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ab1e2e.html [accessed 11 December 2016]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

According to a July 1989 Minority Rights Group report, when the National Resistance Army (NRA) took power in Kampala in January 1986, members of Tito Okello's Uganda National Liberation Army (UNLA) were still leading attacks in the north of the country (21). The 35th Battalion of the NRA, which was sent to garrison Acholi in the north, had been reinforced over-quickly with ex-UNLA soldiers and units of the Federal Democratic Movement (FEDEMO) (ibid.). Members of the 35th Battalion terrorized and committed many atrocities against the civilian population, and a number of deaths were reported (ibid.).

 The above information was corroborated during a 6 February 1996 telephone interview with a professor of political science at the University of Toronto, who added that because of these incidents, some of the battalion's officers were demoted.

Additional information on these subjects could not be found amoung the sources consulted by the DIRB.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of other sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

        Minority Rights Group International. July 1989. No. 66. Uganda. London: Minority Rights Group.

Professor of political science. University of Toronto. 7 February 1996. Telephone interview.

Attachment

        Minority Rights Group International. July 1989. No. 66. Uganda. London: Minority Rights Group, p. 21.

Other Sources Consulted

        Human Rights Watch World Report. 1993, 1994, 1995.

Amnesty International Report. 1993, 1994, 1995.

Human Rights in Africa. 1990. Washington: Brookings Institute.

Africa Confidential [London]. 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996.

Africa Report [New York]. 1994, 1995.

Africa Research Bulletin: Political Series [London]. 1994, 1995.

The Indian Ocean Newletter [Paris]. 1994, 1995, 1996.

Jeune Afrique [Paris]. 1993, 1994, 1995.

On-line searches of news articles.

Oral Sources.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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